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of newtown, connecticut. the people of connecticut can relate to these victims of the assault and all americans can relate to some extent this crime that's occurred. at this elementary school. madam speaker, i have four kids and 10 grandkids, three of my daughters are teachers by profession. my wife is a first grade elementary school teacher. and no parent, no parent ever wants to bury their child. they just don't want to do that. we never want our children to die in their youth. like these children did. so, madam speaker, we mourn with the families of connecticut. we must honor the victims in our prayers and in our words and ask the good lord to bless them, their families, the people of connecticut and yes, our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: the mall shooting that might have been worse and ended in newtown, connecticut, where it's impossible to imagine that it was worse. it's part of an ongoing pattern of c
, connecticut. before we begin, is there anybody else here who has a story they want to share? i also come to this issue through personal experience. my younger brother was shot in a shooting that happened on the observation deck of the empire state building and i have some prepared remarks here but before i begin them, i just want to point out today there will be 32 more families that know the pain and horror that you just heard here today. we pay a lot of attention, and appropriately so, to these mass shootings, the one that andre's son miraculously survived, but we also have to be aware that this happens in our nation every day and as you're going to hear today, as a nation, we are better than this. i want to thank you all for coming on what we are confident is a momentous day in the history of this issue. we have people here from all over the country from utah, california, from colorado, and connecticut. we're here because we love our children, our husbands, our wives, our brothers, and our sisters. we mourn them and we wish they hadn't been shot. we're here as a testament to our love
in connecticut sunday night. no one can erase evil but we need to accept the reality that we're not doing enough to protect our citizens. i'm very happy that the president's going to do everything he can administratively. we must engage in a thoughtful debate how to change laws and culture that allows violence not continue to grow. every idea should be on the table as we discuss how best to keep our children safe. >> [inaudible] >> no, i've been very clear here. i think we have to have a full discussion. >> [inaudible] >> the president has made an overture to the speaker. as we talked about in our caucus today, we hoped to get something affirmative from the republicans. to this they have walked away and not been affirmative. i admire and appreciate very much the president showing the american people how reasonable he's trying to be. significant tax increases, significant cuts. >> would you personally support the reindexes of social security? -- reindexing of social security? >> this is not going to be a situation where we'll vote on a particular provision in the bill. it's going to be a framewor
york, the people of connecticut in particular, others as well, have sustained a very, very damaging blow both corporately and individually. we need to act on that. historically supplementals are not paid for, are passed so that we can meet the immediate need. mr. crowley will speak to that. but let me say this. the answer to your question is it's part of the math. if we're going to put our country on a fiscally sustainable path, we're going to have to consider all the expenditures we made, whether we paid for them initially or not, we're going to have to put that into the math and it needs to be a part of the agreement. i've said this is a math problem. certainly the dollars we spend will have to be accounted for and will have to be paid for over a longer period of time. but we can amortize that immediate expense that we need to make on behalf of the severely adversely affected damaged areas, we need to make that expenditure now. but we need to pay for that over the longer term. so to that extent, yes, it will be part of the -- for my own standpoint, part of the math that will have
and in connecticut and not just this disaster but going back to 2011 and the catastrophe that connecticut suffered when you personally contacted me and offered assistance. i want the people to know that they have a real friend in the senator of louisiana. your leadership has been tremendous in this area. i want to briefly say thank you to the president for providing the strong leadership that he has in the wake of this disaster in connecticut. he prompely declared connecticut an emergency area and that permitted the s.p.a. to come along along with fema and the people on the ground that have been there for quite some time, many of the fema officials in advance of the storm. unfortunately, many of these recent storms and their scope and depth and the devastation they cause that we may face a new normal in this kind of catastrophic weather-related event. we need to prepare in the longer term as well as the short term that why the suggests made early this morning and other improvements will be made are so critically important. i think you need to know that the connecticut s.p.a. office has approved $6
in connecticut is outrageous and horrible. all of us are just very saddened. >> see the rest of this sequence -- segment at c-span.org. >> io am davejkeane president of the national rifle association and i would like to welcome you to begin our discussion of the topic that has been on the minds of american parents across this country. that is -- what do we do about the tragedy of the sort that struck in newtown, conn. to avoid such events in the future? like most americans, we were shocked by what happened. like all americans, we have been discussing all of the various options that are available to protect our children and, at this point, we would like to share our thinking with few. that purpose, i like to introduce wayne lapierre our executive vice president. at the end of this conference, we will not be taking questions that next week, we will be available to any of you who are interested in talking about these or other issues of interest. contact us, please, at that point, thank you very much. wayne? >> good morning. the national rifle association, 4 million others -- mothers, fathers, so
are still waiting for more formation about the incidents in connecticut. as we do, i think it's important, on a day like today, to view this as i know the president, as a father, does, and others who are parents certainly do which is to feel enormous sympathy for those families affected and to do everything that we can to support state and local law enforcement and support those who are enduring what appears to be a very tragic event. there is, i am sure, more discussion of the usual washington policy debates, but i do not think today is that day. >> can you say more about how the meeting was speaker boehner last night? where do stand out -- order things stand now? are there further plans for a talk to the progress? withe president's meeting the speaker of the house was frank. it lasted a little less than an hour. the lines of communication remain open. i don't know why i see smiles in response to that. it is a very candid assessment. the president continues to believe that a deal is possible, that not only looks at the deadlines with the fiscal cliff and allows us to achieve something fa
times -- or warwick, arizona, fort hood and now in connecticut. in 2008 he pledged i think that the dnc that he would keep ak- 47's out of criminal and an advocate it reinstating the assault weapons ban. what does the president say to americans in communities like when he visited yesterday why nothing more has happened yet? >> the president's support for reinstatement of the assault weapons ban has been the case ever since it expired, and has been true for the past several years. the fact is, we have taken steps to include background checks, which those at the issue preventing those that should not have guns from acquiring them. but as you heard the president said last night, we all need to do more. we must change. we must take more action and a greater action to address this problem. because we have not adequately, it in his view, -- in his view, of taking care of our first priority, and this case, taking care of our children. he committed himself, as you heard him last night say, to use the power of his office to help us bring about the change. and he will do that in a way that is inc
, connecticut, for all the good this nation has done to lift up children we still have much more work to do. so, mr. speaker, before i get into my remarks about the bill, i first want to extend my heartfelt condolences to the victims and their loved ones struggling as we all are to understand this senseless assault on children and their educators. and while newtown is rightly receiving the nation's attention, what goes unnoticed far too often is the number of children that die each year in this country as a result of abuse and neglect. sadly their deaths often come at the hands of those who should be caring for them the most. state reports indicate that more than 1,500 children in the u.s. died from abuse or neglect in fiscal year 2010. and research shows that these reports may significantly understate the actual number of these fatalities. congress should do what it can to prevent these tragedies which is why this legislation is before us today. this legislation is a result of careful bipartisan work over the past couple of years. in 2010 i requested that the government accountability office,
changed as well. it's my understanding the state of connecticut had the type of gun laws that have been proposed and they didn't work. at the end of the day it's an individual person, it's a people problem. and changing laws doesn't necessarily change hearts. it is a cultural problem as well. that's why i don't think we need to change these laws but we need to look at an issue of society where violence has become acceptable in many avenues and simply need to turn on the television many nights to see that. the first question was about the top 2% and class warfare and what is going on. but clearly 70% of americans take more from washington than they give. here we are as republicans upsets me that with the vote today and with the offer of speaker john boehner we've given into what the president has agreed. we have to go after the so-called rich. but as i indicated earlier, 41% of small business income is going to be taxed at a higher rate. and so this is just not the warren buffetts of the world. this is actually entrepreneurs that are actually paying income taxes on -- it stays in their b
recognition? without objection, the gentleman from connecticut is recognized for one minute. mr. courtney: we have the power as members to actually pay this country back from a fiscal cliff which endangers an economic recovery and threatens middle class families across the country. the good news is there right now. consumer confidence is up, car sales are up, even the housing market is making a he recovery. if we do not, however, act, to sign this discharge petition and protect middle class families, we will go backwards as a nation. it will also solve 3/4 of the sequestration challenge that the budget control act is still sitting out there for january 2. if we sign this discharge petition, get this bill passed, 3/4 of the problems will be solved and we'll protect medicare, we'll protect our military, we'll protect education. and it will reduce the size of the challenge to avoid sequestration. all members, republicans and democrats, should come together, sign this discharge petition, and help the american people get this economy back on its feet. i yield back the balance of my time. the speak
, connecticut, many wonder what do they have in common? gun tragedy, the loss of 26 lives, and americans suffering from a devastating storm, certainly our hearts goes out to those babies who were lost. but it really speaks to americans in need, and i guess that's why i'm so troubled to be on the floor today, because the framework that we have says to america that when you're in need we will not as this congress and this government be prepared to help you. i think what is disappointing and i know for the speaker, it is probably the same case as i am speaking because just about three days ago we thought there was a deal between the white house and the framework that was offered and the leadership of this house. it's disappointing that in the course of a couple days we've come to a situation where this plan, plan b, raises only about $300 billion from high-income households and the centers for budget priorities suggest that millionaires will get $108,500 per $1 million, over $1 million in tax cuts, but what will the middle class gets? plan b allows the old pre-bush or bush tax cuts to conti
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12